Crochet “Record” Coasters and Hot Pads

Introduction

Vinyl records are making a comeback in some circles, both for their sound quality and retro image.  Of course, some of us had never given them up in the first place.

These designs use an old craft (crochet) to make something that looks like an old technology (the vinyl record) to be used for an old and mundane purpose (protecting your table).

I made the first three designs as a gift for a millennial who enjoys buying new vinyl. Then I made a couple more for myself.

I chose a red and black scheme, but sometime I might make a blue and yellow one to mimic the 78’s that my parents had.

General Directions

If you know how to crochet a flat disc, you can probably figure out how you want to make these on your own.  I am providing the photos so you can see if you like the look or not.

To make my “records” I did the center “label” in red with double crochet and joined each row (ring) with a slip stitch.   For the black “vinyl” part, I used single crochet, and did NOT join, but crocheted in a spiral like record “groove.” After the first row of black sc’s crocheted in the red dc’s, I started the spiral.  From then on I crocheted the sc’s only in the back loops of the black sc’s to look more like a “groove” (albeit a big one). You can decide if you like that look or not.

Photos

Here are the photos.  I will put more detailed instruction below.

orig
These are the ones I made and gave away.  In this photo they look a little out of round, but they were circular.
New ones
These are the hot pad and coaster I made for myself, and you can see them more clearly than in the old photo.  I have an old 45 there for comparison.

 

Coaster

The first coaster I made was only one piece.  For most uses, that is enough.

I have a family member, however, who routinely leaves a full glass of ice water on a coaster overnight in the summer.  By morning the condensation soaks through thin coasters and damages the table underneath.

So, for my coaster, I made two and sewed them back to back.  This is thick enough to provide protection but thin enough to keep the cup or glass stable.

To start the coaster, I used red cotton yarn and a size H hook.

New coaster
The Coaster

Start with a ch 4 and use a slip stitch to join in a ring. (I think for one of the coasters I only used 2 chains and did the next row of sc’s in the second chain from the hook.  Depends on how large you want the opening in the middle.)

First row: 7 sc in the middle. Join last sc to first with a slip stitch.

Second row: Ch 3 (counts as first dc) and dc in same space. 2 dc in each sc.  (14 dc). Join last dc to first with a slip stitch.

Fasten off red. Join black cotton yarn with a slip stitch in the top of any dc and ch 1.

Third row:  Sc in joining stitch. 2 sc in next dc.  Repeat 1 sc in next dc, 2 sc in next dc around.  Do NOT join.

Fourth row:  sc in the the back loops only of black sc’s .  For the fourth row I changed the pattern of increases to (1 sc in next two sc’s, 2 sc in next sc) around.

Subsequent rows:  Continue in a spiral pattern doing sc’s in the back loops only.  Increase the number of sc’s between increases for each row.  I increase the number of sc’s between increases by about 1 per row (e.g. row 5 would follow the pattern of 1 sc in next three sc’s, 2 sc in next sc, repeat), but I use that more as a rule of thumb than a law.

When the coaster is the size you want (Mine was between 4” and 4 ½”), use a slip stitch to join the last sc to the next sc. Fasten off.

“45 Record” Hot Pad

This hot pad has the 1 ½ inch diameter hole found in the middle of most 45’s.

New 45 along
“45” Hot Pad

To start this hot pad, ch 21 and join with a slip stitch into a ring. (Add or subtract chains to get the diameter you want).

First row: Chain 3 (counts as first dc). 25 dc in middle of the ring. (26 dc).  Join last dc to first with a slip stitch.

Second row:  Chain 3 (counts as first dc). 2 dc in next dc. Repeat 1 dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc around. Join last dc to first with a slip stitch. (39 dc).

Fasten off red. Join black with a slip stitch to any dc.

Third row:  Sc in joining stitch. Sc in next 2 dc. 2 sc in next dc.   Repeat 1 sc in next  3 dc, 2 sc in next dc around.  Do NOT join.

Subsequent rows:  Sc in the the back loops only of black sc’s  and continue as for the coaster until it is the size you want.  I continued crocheting rows until the piece measured between 6 ½ – 7 inches in diameter—the size of my 45 record.

“LP Album” Hot Pad

This hot pad has a small center hole like the coaster. Unlike the coaster, I dispensed with the first row of sc’s .

Old LP
“LP” Hot Pad

With red Ch 4 and use a slip stitch to join in a ring.

First row: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). Dc 15 in center ring.  Join last dc to first with a slip stitch. (16 dc).

Second row: Ch 3 (counts as first dc).  Dc in same space. Repeat 2 dc in each dc around.  Join last dc to first with a slip stitch. (32 dc).

Third row: Ch 3 (counts as first dc). 2 dc in next dc. Repeat 1 dc in next dc, 2 dc in next dc around. Join last dc to first dc with a slip stitch. (48 dc).

Fasten off red. Join black with a slip stitch in any dc. Continue as for the “45 record hot pad.”

I was going to make my “LP” the size of a real LP, which is about 12 inches in diameter, but I got tired of working on it and stopped it at a smaller size.  The “label” area is 4 inches in diameter, the same as for a 12 inch LP.  If you wanted your hot pad to be smaller than 12 inches, but look more like a mini-LP rather than a cut-off one like mine, you could scale down the size of the “label” to be ⅓ the diameter of the finished product.

Idea    light bulb

I would like to see an afghan made of sewing together a bunch of these 6” – 7” diameter record motifs.  If anyone ever reads this and then does it, please post a photo of the final product here, even if it has been years from this original post!

Abbreviations

If it’s not obvious, I am using American crochet terms.

Ch = chain

Sc = single crochet

Dc = double crochet

 

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